House, Senate to vote on $2,000 stimulus checks

[ad_1]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she would bring congress members back into session to vote to increase the economic impact payments from $600 to $2,000.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. House and Senate are expected to vote on a standalone bill to increase the economic impact payments from the newest COVID-19 relief aid from $600 to $2,000.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., on Christmas Eve said she would be bringing the House back to session Monday to hold a vote.

“To vote against this bill is to deny the financial hardship that families face and to deny them the relief they need,” she said in a statement.

President Donald Trump signed the $900 billion pandemic relief package Sunday, ending days of drama over his refusal to accept the bipartisan deal that will deliver long-sought cash to businesses and individuals and avert a federal government shutdown.

The massive bill includes $1.4 trillion to fund government agencies through September and contains other end-of-session priorities such as an increase in food stamp benefits.

RELATED: President Trump signs massive funding bill into law, includes $600 stimulus checks

RELATED: The second stimulus check: When to expect it, how much you will get

The signing, at his private club in Florida, came amid escalating criticism over his eleventh-hour demands for larger, $2,000 relief checks and scaled-back spending even though the bill had already passed the House and Senate by wide margins. The bill was passed with what lawmakers had thought was Trump’s blessing, and after months of negotiations with his administration.

“Now, the President must immediately call on Congressional Republicans to end their obstruction and to join him and Democrats in support of our stand-alone legislation to increase direct payment checks to $2,000, which will be brought to the Floor tomorrow,” Pelosi said in a statement after Trump signed the relief bill.

In a statement, Trump repeated his frustrations with the COVID-19 relief bill for providing only $600 checks to most Americans instead of the $2,000 that his fellow Republicans already rejected. He also complained about what he considered unnecessary spending by the government at large.

“I will sign the Omnibus and Covid package with a strong message that makes clear to Congress that wasteful items need to be removed,” Trump said in the statement.

While the president insisted he would send Congress “a redlined version” with items to be removed under the rescission process, those are merely suggestions to Congress. The bill, as signed, would not necessarily be changed.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said he would offer Trump’s proposal for $2,000 checks for a vote in Senate — putting Republicans on the spot.

“The House will pass a bill to give Americans $2,000 checks. Then I will move to pass it in the Senate,” Schumer tweeted. “No Democrats will object. Will Senate Republicans?”

Democrats are promising more aid to come once President-elect Joe Biden takes office, but Republicans are signaling a wait-and-see approach.

RELATED: Here’s who won’t get a second stimulus check from the COVID-19 relief bill

RELATED: Republicans block $2,000 checks as Trump leaves COVID-19 aid in chaos

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.

The United States has more than 19 million confirmed cases of COVID-19, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

As of Monday, the U.S. had more than 333,000 deaths from the virus. Worldwide, there are more than 80 million confirmed cases with more than 1.7 million deaths.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



[ad_2]

Source link

Related Posts

Marya Vinget

Marya Vinget is a freelance writer who works for may content writing agencies and for personal blog owners. She loves to write about everything from Tech to entertainment, You can hire her for the versatile writing attitude.